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Stop Looking at Me

QuitLookingAtMe_2

Form Follows Fiction

We take functionality (for granted)
We fake functionality (for effect)

Is the Internet Being Ruined? (Freakonomics)

Are we only seeing what we want to see on the internet?
Is the Internet Being Ruined?

Journal 7.18.16

Walking through a park on my lunch break. A swarm of dragonflies criss cross overhead. It’s fun to think of what it would be like for dragonflies to have air traffic controllers, but I think I prefer the elaborate randomness of a system that I can simply bare witness to without understanding.

Study Says Making Art Reduces Stress, Even If You Kind Of Suck At It

The reslts, published in Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, titled “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making,” found that 45 minutes of creative activity significantly lessens stress in the body, regardless of artistic experience or talent.

“It was surprising, and it also wasn’t,” Kaimal explained to Drexel Now. “It wasn’t surprising because that’s the core idea in art therapy: Everyone is creative and can be expressive in the visual arts when working in a supportive setting. That said, I did expect that perhaps the effects would be stronger for those with prior experience.”

The study, co-authored by Kendra Ray, a doctoral student under Kaimal, and Juan Muniz, an assistant teaching professor in the department of nutrition sciences, invited 39 adults, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, to participate. Markers, paper, clay and collage materials were amongst the tools offered up to the participants, who were instructed to create whatever they so pleased over the course of 45 minutes, with no further directives. An art therapist was on site in case the participants had any questions or concerns.
The results, published in Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, titled “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making,” found that 45 minutes of creative activity significantly lessens stress in the body, regardless of artistic experience or talent.

“It was surprising, and it also wasn’t,” Kaimal explained to Drexel Now. “It wasn’t surprising because that’s the core idea in art therapy: Everyone is creative and can be expressive in the visual arts when working in a supportive setting. That said, I did expect that perhaps the effects would be stronger for those with prior experience.”

The study, co-authored by Kendra Ray, a doctoral student under Kaimal, and Juan Muniz, an assistant teaching professor in the department of nutrition sciences, invited 39 adults, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, to participate. Markers, paper, clay and collage materials were amongst the tools offered up to the participants, who were instructed to create whatever they so pleased over the course of 45 minutes, with no further directives. An art therapist was on site in case the participants had any questions or concerns.

Article Link
Study Says Making Art Reduces Stress, Even If You Kind Of Suck At It

Being Creative is a Job

“Crime is a job.
Sex is a job.
Growing up is a job.
School is a job.
Going to parties is a job.
Religion is a job.
Being creative is a job.”

– David Byrne

Dave Trott on Predatory Thinking

A Video Visualization of the Creative Process